Russian Soyuz blasts off for ISS in firs...

Russian Soyuz blasts off for ISS in first launch since accident


An unmanned rocket carrying cargo blasted off into space on Friday in the first launch of a Russian-made Soyuz-FG rocket from Kazakhstan's Baikonur cosmodrome since a dramatic aborted launch in October.

How much does a kilogram weigh? Depends on your 'Planck constant'

It may not change how you buy bananas, but scientists have voted to redefine the value of a kilogram, in what they called a landmark decision that will boost the accuracy of scientific measurements.

Read more


SpaceX, TeleSat Canada bids get U.S. nod to expand satellite internet

WASHINGTON (Reuters - The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allow Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk's Space X, Telesat Canada [PSPENC.UL] and two other companies to roll out new satellite-based broadband services.

Read more


Face off: Realistic masks made in Japan find demand from tech, car companies

Super-realistic face masks made by a tiny company in rural Japan are in demand from the domestic tech and entertainment industries and from countries as far away as Saudi Arabia.

Read more


'We trust our rocket', crew says ahead of first space launch since failure

A U.S. astronaut said on Thursday she had full confidence in the safety of the Russian-made Soyuz rocket that will blast a three-person crew into space next month in the first such launch since a rocket failure.

Read more


Frigid planet detected orbiting nearby star

A frozen and dimly lit planet, dubbed a "Super-Earth," may be orbiting the closest single star to our solar system, astronomers said on Wednesday, based on two decades of scientific observations.

Read more


After aborted mission, NASA astronaut confident about December launch

The American astronaut who will hitch the first ride on a Russian rocket since last month's aborted launch and dramatic emergency landing is confident that her scheduled trip in December on a rocket that she calls a "workhorse" will go smoothly.

Read more


Scientists to swap dusty old kilogram for something more stable

After years of nursing a sometimes dusty cylinder of metal in a vault outside Paris as the global reference for modern mass, scientists are updating the definition of the kilogram.

Read more


Stephen Hawking's thesis and wheelchair sell for $1 million

A motorized wheelchair used by the late British physicist Stephen Hawking sold at auction on Thursday for almost 300,000 pounds ($391,740.00) while a dissertation raised nearly twice that at a sale to raise money for charity.

Read more


Scientists angry at UK visa denials for African, Asian researchers

Scientists in Britain expressed concern on Thursday after at least 17 delegates from Africa and Asia wanting to attend a health conference in London were denied visas.

Read more


Bill Gates, on China trip, lauds free trade - and futuristic toilets

U.S. billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates unveiled on Tuesday in Beijing a futuristic toilet that doesn't need water or sewers and uses chemicals to turn human waste into fertilizer.

Read more


Portugal to build satellite launch pad, lab with China

Portugal plans to build an international launch pad for small satellites in the Azores and has agreed with China to set up a joint research center to make satellites on the mainland, its science and technology minister said on Tuesday.

Read more


Gene study reveals secrets of parasitic worms, possible treatments

The largest study to date of the genetic makeup of parasitic worms has found hundreds of new clues about how they invade the human body, evade its immune system and cause disease.

Read more


South Africans make bricks from human urine

South African researchers say they have made bricks using human urine in a natural process involving colonies of bacteria, which could one day help reduce global warming emissions by finding a productive use for the ultimate waste product.

Read more


To the Moon and beyond: Airbus delivers powerhouse for NASA's Orion spacecraft

Europe's Airbus on Friday delivered the "powerhouse" for NASA's new Orion Spaceship that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond in coming years, hitting a key milestone that should lead to hundreds of millions of euros in future orders.

Read more


Some dinosaurs had exquisite eggs with colors, spots, speckles

Some dinosaurs laid colored, speckled and spotted eggs boasting exquisite hues of blue and brown, scientists said on Thursday, in a discovery that scrambles the notion that such exceptional traits originated with birds.

Read more


Musk shakes up SpaceX in race to make satellite launch window: sources

SpaceX Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk flew to the Seattle area in June for meetings with engineers leading a satellite launch project crucial to his space company's growth.

Read more


Scientists launch plan to map genes of all complex life on earth

Scientists launched a vast project on Thursday to map the genetic code of all 1.5 million known species of complex life on earth, aiming to complete the work within a decade.

Read more


Russian Soyuz rocket failure caused by damaged sensor: investigation

The abortive launch last month of a manned Soyuz mission to space was caused by a sensor damaged during the rocket's assembly at the cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Russian investigators said on Thursday.

Read more


NASA retires its planet hunter, the Kepler space telescope

The Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel and will be retired after a 9-1/2-year mission in which it detected thousands of planets beyond our solar system and boosted the search for worlds that might harbor alien life, NASA said on Tuesday.

Read more